Magistrate

   A public civil officer invested with authority. The Hebrew shophetim, or judges, were magistrates having authority in the land (Deut. 1:16, 17). In Judg. 18:7 the word "magistrate" (A.V.) is rendered in the Revised Version "possessing authority", i.e., having power to do them harm by invasion. In the time of Ezra (9:2) and Nehemiah (2:16; 4:14; 13:11) the Jewish magistrates were called seganim, properly meaning "nobles." In the New Testament the Greek word archon, rendered "magistrate" (Luke 12:58; Titus 3:1), means one first in power, and hence a prince, as in Matt. 20:25, 1 Cor. 2:6, 8. This term is used of the Messiah, "Prince of the kings of the earth" (Rev. 1:5). In Acts 16:20, 22, 35, 36, 38, the Greek term strategos, rendered "magistrate," properly signifies the leader of an army, a general, one having military authority. The strategoi were the duumviri, the two praetors appointed to preside over the administration of justice in the colonies of the Romans. They were attended by the sergeants (properly lictors or "rod bearers").

Easton's Bible Dictionary. . 1897.

Synonyms:
(in civil service)


Look at other dictionaries:

  • magistrate — mag·is·trate / ma jə ˌstrāt, strət/ n [Latin magistratus magistracy, magistrate, from magistr magister master, political superior] 1: a civil or judicial official vested with limited judicial powers a family support magistrate a traffic… …   Law dictionary

  • magistrate — ma‧gis‧trate [ˈmædʒstreɪt, strt] noun [countable] LAW someone who judges less serious crimes in a court of law: • The judge overturned a magistrate s decision that the documents should remain confidential. • He filed a suit (= brought a case to …   Financial and business terms

  • magistrate — (n.) late 14c., civil officer in charge of administering laws, from O.Fr. magistrat, from L. magistratus a magistrate, public functionary, originally magisterial rank or office, from magistrare serve as a magistrate, from magister chief, director …   Etymology dictionary

  • magistrate — [maj′istrāt΄, maj′istrit] n. [ME < L magistratus < magister,MASTER] 1. a civil officer empowered to administer the law: the President of the U.S. is sometimes called chief magistrate 2. a minor official with limited judicial powers, as a… …   English World dictionary

  • Magistrate — Mag is*trate, n. [L. magistratus, fr. magister master: cf. F. magistrat. See {Master}.] A person clothed with power as a public civil officer; a public civil officer invested with the executive government, or some branch of it. All Christian… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • magistrate — [n] civil officer bailiff, JP, judge, justice, justice of the peace; concept 354 …   New thesaurus

  • magistrate — ► NOUN ▪ a civil officer who administers the law, especially one who conducts a court concerned with minor offences and holds preliminary hearings for more serious ones. ORIGIN Latin magistratus administrator , from magister master …   English terms dictionary

  • Magistrate — For the musical group, see Magistrates (band). Magistrate Sir Lyman Poore Duff, a former judge of the Supreme Court of Canada Occupation Names Judge, Justice of the Peace, magistrat …   Wikipedia

  • magistrate — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ examining (BrE), investigating, licensing (BrE) ▪ chief, senior (BrE) ▪ presiding (BrE) ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

  • magistrate — A judge or justice of an inferior court; a mayor; a justice of the peace. A judge of court, such as a police court, mayor s court, or justice s court, the jurisdiction of which is restricted to the trial of misdemeanors and the conducting of… …   Ballentine's law dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.